The Basics of Canine Senses

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The Basics of Canine Senses


A dog’s nervous and sensory systems are essential to his health and well-being. Perceptions and reactions to his environment are dependent on his senses; movement is controlled through the central nervous system (the brain and spinal cord); and the endocrine system (the hormone-producing glands) controls his patterns of behaviour.

Sight

Canine vision is inferior to human during the day, but is superior at night. Dogs do see colours, but not as distinctly as humans (in pastel as opposed to strong colours), and their peripheral vision is better than ours. In addition to the upper and lower eyelids, there is a third eyelid – the nictitating membrane (haw), which is comprised of a thin sheet of pale tissue tucked away in the corner of the eye. Its function is to help remove dust and dirt from the surface of the eye (cornea) by moving across it during any inward movement, and also to help keep the eyeball moist and lubricated.

Hearing

A dog’s hearing is vastly superior to that of a human and he is, therefore, more sensitive to sounds than we are – especially those at high frequencies which we cannot hear (hence the use of ‘silent’ dog whistles). A dog’s mobile ears help to pinpoint the source of a sound, since they can be directed towards it.

Smell

A dog’s primary sense is his sense of smell, as it is essential in relation to his sex life and hunting for food and water. The area in a dog’s nose for detecting scent is nearly 37 times larger than that in humans, and is approximately 100 times more powerful than a human’s. The parts of the brain that process signals coming in from the nose are far greater in size and complexity in a dog than are the corresponding parts of the human brain.

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Dog Training

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DOG TRAINING


Dogs are very intelligent, but this can only be utilized with respect to the training they receive. Dogs do make great companions, and a well trained dog is truly great company.

Have ever heard the saying – ‘’you don’t teach an old dog new tricks’’. the lesson here is that you should start all training exercise when your dog is still a puppy. Once you get your puppy, the first thing you do is to take him to veterinary clinic. Get him registered and take note of his routine check ups and vaccination protocol/schedule. It is important you have him vaccinated  as when due so that there will be no fear in getting him socialize with people.

On getting home, introduce your puppy to your kids and friends. Let them hold and cuddle him.  This is an important initiation process into the family.

Note ;- you may want your puppy to avoid other dogs until he has had his second set of vaccination.

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Bond and Trust – The Human–Dog relation basis

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Bond and Trust – The Human–Dog relation basis


Dog training is particularly based on a functional communication between the human being and his dog.

The tie between you and your dog isn’t there right from the beginning, but has to be developed with lot of love, devotion and consistency. The Puppy, having stayed with his mother till now, needs to receive this love, protection, contact and rules from you from now on, and of course his basic needs, like feeding, playing, sleeping and cuddling need to be satisfied.

The Puppy still needs to learn a lot, and gain experience every single day. Doing so he will of course face situations that might be scary or disturbing and this is exactly the point where the Puppy needs to trust in you. Together the two of you will face those troubles, find irritating objects and situations, and the trust that is built in those moments will strengthen the bonds between you and your dog a little more every day.

A good relation will further on be the cornerstone of your education, as the dog will only be following your wish if he feels motivated by you and has developed those bonds.

Now how can these ties be developed?

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Puppy Energy Burn Off

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Energy Burn Off


Most all puppies have big bursts of energy at one time of the day or another.

These energy burn off times can be a positive or negative experience. Lets analyze the positive first. If an energy burn off comes up when you are at home with your pup, it can provide you with an excellent opportunity to structure some really fun and educational use of a playtime. The results of this type of session are easy training, fun learning plus the added bonus of a tired out pup at the end of it all.

A tired pup is a quieter and less destruc-tive pet in the house. For this reason, I recom-mend working owners or busy families, to try at all costs to have an energy burn off session with the puppy before leaving for the day. Even 5 to 10 minutes will make a tremendous difference. Then place your puppy in the most puppy-proof room or spot available in your home. A garage is OK if it has been completely puppy proofed and the temperature is reasonable for your particular breed. Provide lots of chewy things, and an old blanket or towel. (OLD so that when you come home and find it shredded you can laugh as you sweep it into the garbage and replace it with another old one).

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Dog Training Equipment

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Dog Training Equipment


In order to determine the proper equipment needed to help train a dog, you first must have a clear idea of just exactly what is going to be the goal of the training. To train a dog simply to be a good household pet is not going to require an excessive amount of special equipment, but to train the dog to be a K-9 attack dog or seeing-eye dog is going to require quite a bit more. The basics for training include the collar and the leash. Most novice pet owners do not take this as serious as they should and tend to select a collar more for its visual appeal than for its training potential.

There are several varieties of collars designed for training. They range from simple snap-on collars to sophisticated electric collars. A general rule of thumb for training collar selection is to select the gentlest collar that accomplishes the goal. Several types of collars, including choke collars and prong collars can cause harm to the dog if not used properly and by an experienced trainer. The leash is another basic equipment item that is often carelessly selected. The leash is the connection between you and your animal and a little investment in the proper size and style of leash for your particular training needs will pay off handsomely.

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Grooming your Dog

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GROOMING YOUR DOG


You take your own personal hygiene very serious, isn’t that it ?  The same should apply to your dog, he also needs to be attended to.

Grooming your dog does two things:

a)            It keeps your dog looking trim and cute

b)            It solidifies the bond between you and your dog.

Equipment necessary for grooming your dogs

They include:- hair clippers, brushes (different types of brushes may be required for different purposes), and combs. Some breeds of dog such as long-coated ones demand a lot of time and patience and the owner has to be prepared to go through  with this to get the dog in a dandy shape.

Suitable methods of grooming for different coats

a)            Rough coated Dogs- these usually require more time and effort for grooming. Usually the rough coats cast about every six months and a lot of hair is lost. It is important that you brush and comb the hair daily to prevent it from getting matted. A stiff brush in combination with a comb will do this job well and you should make sure you get to the root of the hair when doing this. If you feel all this is too much of stress, you just want to take your dog to the vet.

b)            Short-coated dogs – these ones usually take less time and effort to groom. They should be groomed daily using a slightly stiff brush. Example of a short -coated dog is the Bull Terrier.

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Dog Feeding and Nutrition

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DOG FEEDING AND NUTRITION


When it comes to pet keeping, nutrition is a very important subject the health (or life) of your dog depend on the quality and acceptability whatever it is your feed to him. It is used to be claimed that dogs were strictly carnivores and all they needed was meat and bones in their diet. This is false!
Recent findings have it that the dog is better termed an omnivore, because he his able to survive on a diet that is mostly vegetable with some meat. However, a complete lack of meat in his diet will probably lead to nutritional deficiencies.

Dog food should contain a balanced mixture of the major nutrients including carbohydrates, proteins, and fat. They should also have adequate quantity of minerals and vitamins.
Carbohydrates supply the body with energy and excess amounts are stored as fat. Fats also supply the body with energy (though about twice that of carbohydrates). Proteins are involved in tissue growth and repairs and a greater percentage of vital organs in the body are made up of proteins.

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Dog Health Management

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DOG HEALTH MANAGEMENT


From the time you purchase your puppy. You invariably signed a contract with the veterinarian. And as far as your pet’s health is concerned, he is your best friend.

Once you get the puppy, take him over to the vet of your choice and have him registered. The vet would go over him thoroughly, taking note of those things you have missed while purchasing your pet. He will also get to meet your doggy. From here, you will be given a schedule of vaccination he would need to take, and routine check ups may also be scheduled.

Vaccinations your dog would need at his early age taken care of four major diseases – Distemper, Hepatitis, Leptospirosis, Parvovirus and para influenza (DHLPP).  After the initial two inoculations of the vaccine, he is required to come for yearly boosters.

Other vaccination include;- Rabies vaccine (but this depend on the country you live in), because the disease has been totally eradicated in some countries.

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Why dogs like to sit close to our feet

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Why dogs like to sit close to our feet


There are many reasons why a dog may like to sit on an owner’s feet. It all depends on the dog and the other behaviors they exhibit. What kind of dog is it? Is he a pushy dog? A love bug? A dog that always like to be touching someone? Is this an anxious dog who doesn’t like to let the owner out of their sight? The same behavior can be caused by lots of different things, depending on the particular dog.

If you have a dog who is very dominant, then your dog could like to sit on your feet as a way to assert himself over you. He is physically pinning you down and putting himself in a more powerful position. But this would only be the case if this particular dog does other things that make you believe he is trying to be dominant.

Does your  og suffer from separation anxiety? Do they follow you from room to room? Do they go to pieces if they can’t see you? In this case the dog may be trying to reassure himself about your presence. He may be looking for comfort by touching you.

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Complementary Dog and Puppy Medicine

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Complementary Medicine


Complementary medicine, a term often used interchangeably with holistic medicine, provides”nonconventional” treatments for a variety of ailments, and is not just for humans anymore. Pets can now enjoy better health, too, as many veterinarians and pet owners increasingly embrace new techniques and treatments. According to the American Animal Hospital Association’s 2003 National Pet Owner Survey, 21 percent of pet owners have used some form of complementary medicine on their pets. Compare this to the 1996 survey, in which only six percent of pet owners said they’ve used alternative therapies on their pets.

Holistic medicine combines conventional veterinary medicine with one or more complementary therapies. Holistic practitioners consider your pet’s entire well-being, not just individual symptoms or conditions, and mix and match treatments to best serve Spot’s or Fluffy’s needs. A holistic approach to your pet’s problem will likely prove beneficial in nearly all cases. Research into a variety of veterinary medical therapies is ongoing, and the quality of care our pets receive is continually improving. Below, we describe some of the more common complementary medical therapies available.

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