Normal Behavior of Your Dog

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Normal Behavior of Your Dog


Dogs display a number of traits that humans find annoying, strange or even disgusting (eating feces is a prime example). Yet dogs do what they do for a reason. As far as they are concerned, they are doing nothing wrong, and they become confused when we scold them. Knowing why dogs do certain things will enable you to cope better with them as they occur.

Vocal communication

Compared to humans, dogs have a limited ability to communicate using sound and tend to rely more on body language to get their message across. The range of sounds they produce tends to be used to back up their body language rather than in isolation. Howling and growling are the least common sounds, but barking is used frequently, often in different ways to convey different meanings. These can range from guarding barks to those designed to get attention, or barking can be used just to let off steam when excited or frustrated.

Guarding and possession

Natural instinct dictates that to let another take away food will result in hunger. This principle sometimes gets transferred to toys and other items a dog possesses; to give them up is a sign of weakness. Guarding food or a toy, by growling or snapping at anyone who approaches, is a dog’s way of saying ‘this is mine and you are not having it’. However, this line of defence is inappropriate in a human environment. In pet dogs, not letting go of something must be discouraged from an early age, otherwise aggression problems may later result. It is perfectly fine to let a non-aggressive or non-possessive dog occasionally win the toy in a game to keep his play motivation high, but this should be the exception, not the rule.

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Puppy Energy Burn Off

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Energy Burn Off


Most all puppies have big bursts of energy at one time of the day or another.

These energy burn off times can be a positive or negative experience. Lets analyze the positive first. If an energy burn off comes up when you are at home with your pup, it can provide you with an excellent opportunity to structure some really fun and educational use of a playtime. The results of this type of session are easy training, fun learning plus the added bonus of a tired out pup at the end of it all.

A tired pup is a quieter and less destruc-tive pet in the house. For this reason, I recom-mend working owners or busy families, to try at all costs to have an energy burn off session with the puppy before leaving for the day. Even 5 to 10 minutes will make a tremendous difference. Then place your puppy in the most puppy-proof room or spot available in your home. A garage is OK if it has been completely puppy proofed and the temperature is reasonable for your particular breed. Provide lots of chewy things, and an old blanket or towel. (OLD so that when you come home and find it shredded you can laugh as you sweep it into the garbage and replace it with another old one).

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Why dogs like to sit close to our feet

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Why dogs like to sit close to our feet


There are many reasons why a dog may like to sit on an owner’s feet. It all depends on the dog and the other behaviors they exhibit. What kind of dog is it? Is he a pushy dog? A love bug? A dog that always like to be touching someone? Is this an anxious dog who doesn’t like to let the owner out of their sight? The same behavior can be caused by lots of different things, depending on the particular dog.

If you have a dog who is very dominant, then your dog could like to sit on your feet as a way to assert himself over you. He is physically pinning you down and putting himself in a more powerful position. But this would only be the case if this particular dog does other things that make you believe he is trying to be dominant.

Does yourĀ  og suffer from separation anxiety? Do they follow you from room to room? Do they go to pieces if they can’t see you? In this case the dog may be trying to reassure himself about your presence. He may be looking for comfort by touching you.

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